Trip to Tancook

My love of visiting islands is no secret. While Big Tancook Island didn’t make my top 5 it has been on my radar for a few years as a place I’d like to visit.

 

I have a pretty clear definition of what makes an island an island. If you can drive there, your island status has pretty much been revoked in my mind. It’s the challenge of ferry service that sets island life apart from that of mainland destinations. The ferry to Tancook didn’t disappoint. I was fascinated by the loading/unloading process. No cars for visitors touring the island or for islanders heading to the mainland. Cargo is loaded into containers and hoisted on and off the ferry.

 

 

Before arriving on Big Tancook, the ferry stops at Little Tancook Island, just long enough to load and unload.

 

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The Saddest Weiner Dog Ever

I have this love-hate relationship with knit toys. I love the end result, but they all seem to involve my least favourite part of knitting – sewing. For some reason I had this crazy idea that if I knit a toy as a flat square it would be more fun to assemble. Actually, it was more on the lines of: “a square is easy to knit. I’ll worry about the details later”. If I had a nickel every time I thought the last part of the that thought…

 

Anyway, I got to this stage:

 

…thought “WHAT was I thinking!” (again, if I had a nickel) and settled down with the instructions to figure it out.

 

The put together involved counting, and apparently also had some dependence on knitting the exact number of rows, not just knitting til it sort of looked like a square. As I got putting it together, I kept thinking:

 

“My that head looks small.”

 

I did the next couple of instructions, assuring myself it was one of those mysteries of the universe that would suddenly make sense when it was done.

 

It didn’t; the head still looks small.

 

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Wharves in Cape Breton

One of my favourite parts of work trips is when there is an opportunity to tour the area, particularly the wharves and harbours. While these stops used to make me crazy when I was growing up (I would have much preferred a gift shop or two) I’ve learned to appreciate the bustle and character each harbour possesses. Here are some highlights from last week in Cape Breton.

 

Adler Point

North Sydney

 

Glace Bay

 

Port Morien

 

 

 

 

Chinese Takeout

Things I learned today:

  1. While I love Chinese takeout it doesn’t always come with forks.  Or chopsticks.  Or any type of eating utensil.
  2. While I love Chinese takeout, it should really be taken home to be eaten. Rice should not be eaten hunched over the armrest of a Subaru.
  3. While I love Chinese takeout, it’s really stinky after sitting in your car for 3 hours.


For the record: it was completely worth it.

The Joys of Being Forty-Something

I’ve worked with people older than me most of my life and I would oh-so-smugly offer to hold papers across the table so people could read them. There comes a point as you reach the age of forty-something that you begin to realize certain things, like that’s really not that funny anymore, because suddenly, this happens:

 

I always assumed I’d know when I needed reading glasses and I’d have another reason to curse my Tyrannosaurus Rex like short arms. Instead things far away got blurry as my eyes attempted to compensate. Six months after I got a new prescription and a suggestion from my optomologist to pick up dollar store reading glasses, those pesky things far away got blurry again (never saw that coming). So I broke down and ordered a five pack from Amazon, because I know me and, well, I lose things. I swear the minute I put that first pair in face, I noticed this:

 

 

That’s right, my first grey hair is a crazy outgrowth of my eyebrows. I swear it wasn’t there before (though it is possible I just couldn’t see it). I like to believe it grew in cartoon character fast – put on reading glasses and **POP** there’s your grey hair.

 

Awesome.

 

I’m going to go price geritol. I’m not sure what it is but I have a feeling I’ll be needing it by the weekend. 🤓

A Tale of Two Critiques

Donald Trump has obviously become a very polarizing public figure. Every public comment or tweet is subject to disection and dirision. Deserved or not will depend on your politics, but last week I was struck by two critiques: both their similarities and how divergent they were.

 

The first was the photo of Kathy Griffin holding a bloody head that resembled Donald Trump. The photo quickly went viral, then a whirlwind of backlash ensued. (Then there was backlash to the backlash, as seems to frequently be the case on social media.) There were opinions that she’d gone too far; a line had been crossed; and she was inciting violence. It reached a crescendo when Donald himself weighed in:

 

Meanwhile, over on Facebook just after the United States removed itself from the Paris Climate Accord, Ben and Jerry’s Canada posted a link to a post entitled: “6 Reasons Pulling Out of the Paris Climate Agreement Was Totally, Definitely the Right Move“. Ben and Jerry’s has always been a little quirky, but their six point take on climate change was sarcasm at its finest. Not surprising (maybe a bit) it didn’t reach the viral level of the Kathy Griffin photo.

 

Both were a criticism of President Trump. Both were an attempt at humour. I would guess that the only one you heard about last week involved Kathy Griffin. To be heard above the constant noise of social media, do you have to be shocking? Is the fall out worth it? Ms. Griffin basically said it wasn’t for her with loss of employment and friends. How do we move beyond the lowest common denominator to a place where ideas not people can be debated?

 

Until then, I think I’m only going to follow ice cream companies…and maybe their trucks.